SUMMARY FOR REPRODUCTIVE JUSTICE

Reproduction through an Intersectional Lens

This module has explored a central concern of feminist scholars and activists: reproductive justice. Along the way we have discussed the concept of birth in feminist philosophy as well as the history of the abortion debate in Canada. As we saw, women of colour collectives have developed the concept of reproductive justice to be more capacious than reproductive rights, in recognition of the ways issues such as racial and colonial oppression, forced sterilization, coercive abortion and birth control, the foster care system, poverty, geographical barriers, substandard living conditions, environmental racism and climate injustice intersect with the politics of reproduction.

Test Yourself

Challenges

Reproductive Justice CHALLENGE ONE

CHALLENGE ONE: In the context of human overpopulation, climate change, and biodiversity loss, what do you think of the Donna Haraway and Kim TallBear’s suggestion, which was discussed in the video lecture, that we “Make Kin, Not Babies”? For this Challenge, write a reflection on this topic which 1) shows an engagement with the materials in this module and 2) demonstrates research beyond the module. Write a short (500-750-word) reflection and share it in the Challenge Sharing Forum by Friday at noon.

Reproductive Justice
CHALLENGE TWO

CHALLENGE TWO: In the context of settler colonialism, in which legal and medical institutions have been enablers and practitioners of forced sterilizations, and in which capitalist values have spelled ecocidal practices with dire impacts for the reproductive health of Indigenous women, what do you think of Stote’s argument that reproductive justice may require decolonization? For this Challenge, write a reflection on this topic which 1) shows an engagement with the materials in this module and 2) demonstrates research beyond the module. Write a short (500-750-word) reflection and share it in the Challenge Sharing Forum by Friday at noon.