BIG IDEAS + LESSON FOR INDIGENOUS SEXUALITIES

The authors we will read this week get us thinking about the lasting impacts of sexual colonization, and how our ideas about sex and sexuality are deeply structured. To say that sex and sexuality are structured means that our ideas of sex and sexuality are not merely personal preference or choice, but are collective, historical, and shaped in and through structures such as patriarchy, capitalism, the state, and colonization. 

To begin, ask yourself: How does capitalism structure sex, sexuality, and sexual relationships? How has the Canadian state shaped dominant understandings of sex, sexuality, and intimate arrangements? What does colonialism have to do with sexuality? How does patriarchy shape my understandings of sex and my own sexuality?It is difficult to imagine what sex and sexuality are outside of the confines of these structures! This is especially so for Indigenous people, which is why the idea of decolonizing sexuality is so important for many Indigenous scholars and activists who write about gender and sexuality. Decolonizing sexuality requires thoroughly understanding the history of settler and sexual colonization, its effects on psyches, bodies, families, and collectives. The authors we will discuss this week each have specific strategies for decolonizing sexuality. 


BIG IDEA: Decolonizing Sex

Listen to Episode #5 “Decolonizing Sex” of the All My Relations podcast.

LISTEN:
All My Relations podcast, Episode #5 “Decolonizing Sex”
Listening Time: 43:25 Minutes

All My Relations podcast, Episode #5 “Decolonizing Sex”

BIG IDEA: INDIGIQUEER

LISTEN:
All My Relations podcast, Episode #6 “Indigiqueer”
Listening Time: 56:00 Minutes